Dedicated mobile websites ruled out in the era of iPhones

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We’re in an iPhone-era. The iPhone itself – and the me-to’s of Google Android, RIM Blackberry and the lot – have changed the game of mobile phones and mobile computing, creating its very own category.

This shift now begins to manifest itself in available stats:

During the past 18 month, the usage of iPhones for surfing the web has grown exponentially. Have a look at the numbers I’ve just drawn up from the official Danish web-stats: from 460.000 pages in February 08 to 3,43 million pages in August 09:

Growth of iPhone-served page-views

Monthly page-views conducted by devices with a screen resolution of 320 by 396 (iphones and ipod touches), all websites, from August 2007 to August 2009. Found the numbers digging and interpreting the databases of FDIM/gemiusAudience

I’ve added the exponential tendency-line. It should be pretty significant with an R-spuare of 98,29.

Interestingly enough, stats for the use of the dedicated mobile web-sites shows a decreasing trend (!)

Index (Aug. 08=100) of monthly page-views conducted by devices with a screen resolution of 320 by 396 (iPhones and iPod touches). , all websites vs. Monthly page-views on selected 19 mobile websites. Found the numbers digging and interpreting the databases of FDIM/gemiusAudience

Index (Aug. 08=100) of monthly page-views conducted by devices with a screen resolution of 320 by 396 (iPhones and iPod touches). , all websites vs. Monthly page-views on selected 19 mobile websites. Found the numbers digging and interpreting the databases of FDIM/gemiusAudience

Although the individual sites displays large variation, none of them gets close to the growth-rates of the iPhone.

Monthly page-views, top 5 mobile websites (as per August 08). Found the numbers digging and interpreting the databases of FDIM/gemiusAudience Mobil-listen

Monthly page-views, top 5 mobile websites (as per August 08). Found the numbers digging and interpreting the databases of FDIM/gemiusAudience Mobil-listen

This indicates that iPhone-growth primarily happens elsewhere: iPhone-users are fans of internet-surfing – but not of surfing the mobile websites. Instead they prefer the regular stuff. Although not entirely convincing, you are actually able to navigate the full-fledged web-version on your iPhone to such an extend, most users won’t settle with the stripped-down mobile websites. (I can’t wait for mobile websites and mobile apps which are not just stripped-down websites, but build to take advantage of all the stuff possible with the new smart-phones).

Read on in my latest report: Smart-phones leading the way: The case of iPhone and dedicated mobil-sites in Denmark

3 thoughts on “Dedicated mobile websites ruled out in the era of iPhones”

  1. Pingback: Tweets that mention Dedicated mobile websites ruled out in the era of iPhones « Jon Lund -- Topsy.com

  2. Hi Jon

    Thank your for sharing your research.

    It is surely amazing how iPhone users seem to be careless about data costs. Flatrate is cool.

    I think you’re missing the point on mobile websites (and maybe many web publishers using FDIM are also). Mobile websites are not going to attract iPhone users with small screen layouts of their desktop websites. Publishers need to rethink their offerings to create a CONTEXT based webservice instead of their standard content based. Also it seems that FDIM publishers are mostly driven by selling ads to the emerging market for mobile advertising. They put only enough development into their mobile websites to keep them updated and displaying ads. Being high-ranked on FDIM is a way of pushing up ad-payment.

    So if you look at all the websites focused on providing context relevant services like (I hate to admit) Facebook does, then they will surely be the ones to attract mobile surfing in the future. Small screens or mid-size screens.

  3. Hi Simon,

    I think we’re pretty much in line here, aren’t we? It seems to me your point is somewhat an elaboration my statement above: “I can’t wait for mobile websites and mobile apps which are not just stripped-down websites, but build to take advantage of all the stuff possible with the new smart-phones”.

    And yep: “context” – or how to take advantage of all the things smartphones allows you to do – is key. There’s a whole new world of augmented reality, gesture-based computing and a bunch of other exiting stuff waiting for us out there.

    But trying to strip down your present websites into a mobile version, doesn’t do the trick.

    Regards,
    Jon

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